Saturday Snippets (July 31)

As well as reading a lot of books, I also read a ton of articles every week. Here are some of the articles that I’ve read recently and have found interesting, helpful, challenging and encouraging. I hope that they will be the same for you, my dear readers…

Does the Book of Acts Teach Spontaneous Baptisms?

A bit of a longer read, but a really interesting article. I guarantee that I have readers on both sides of this topic.

Do lay-elders have it worse than paid-elders?

“The difference should be quantity, but not quality. A lay-elder should be investing in his training and development in godliness, in his knowledge of the Word and His love for the Lord and His people as the paid-elder should be. The lay-elder should be investing just as many hours into preparing to preach and teach than the paid-elder, but the timings of that will be different because of their different circumstances. The work of the paid-elder and lay-elder should be the same in quality, but not in quantity.”

Why the Ordinary Means of Grace Must Be Central in Our Gatherings

“All the ordinances of God, but especially the Word read and preached, the sacraments of baptism and the Supper, and the prayers of the people of God: these are the outward and ordinary means Christ uses to impart the blessings of the gospel to his people by the Holy Spirit.”

Conspectus Volume 31

A theological journal of the South African Theological Seminary. I must caveat this by saying that I haven’t read all of the articles yet.

Mailbag #54: Personal Conviction v. Church Tradition; My Wife Doesn’t Want Me to Pastor

Really interesting and insightful responses by Leeman to great questions.

Trench Warfare, Politics, and the Church

“The Bible stands over our partisan allegiances and offers correction to the way our world evaluates politics. The question isn’t whether or not my political thinking is out of step with God’s Kingdom ethics, the question is where? We all have blind spots and we need the Bible to offer correction.”

Becoming Human at Home

“In his own lifetime, the Dutch theologian Herman Bavinck (1854–1921) was well-known for his insistence that Christianity is good news for all of life. Rather than treating it as an abstract message that issues us a ticket to heaven whilst leaving the remainder of our earthly lives more or less untouched, Bavinck saw Christianity in strikingly holistic terms. Indeed, he believed it was better news than many Christians realized: good news not simply for the soul, but also for the body; not only for the church, but also for society; not just for your worship, but also for your work.”

Former Mars Hill Elders: Mark Driscoll Is Still ‘Unrepentant,’ Unfit to Pastor

Mark Driscoll has been on people’s minds again more recently with some signs of repeated behaviour which lead to his leaving Mars Hill. Pray for Mark and for those who want to help him be accountable for his actions.

You Need to Be Inconvenienced for Your Church

“For the sake of greater satisfaction in Jesus, let’s stop orienting His church to our lives, and begin orienting our lives to His church. When that happens, we’ll no longer be treating the church like a commodity that is subject to our convenience. Instead we’ll be delighting in it as the precious bride for which Christ laid down his life.”

HOW MUCH DOES A PASTOR WORK?: WRESTLING WITH THE AMBIGUITIES OF A PASTOR’S TIMESHEET

An insight into Benjamin’s mind and ministry. I’ve been blessed greatly by this brother. He is an encourager and a gifted man in the Lord’s service.

How Do Churches End Up with Domineering Bullies for Pastors?

“The flock is to be led, yes, but not by force of personality. The flock is to be led by beauty of example. Being domineering is bad leadership; and the answer to bad leadership is not no leadership but the right kind of leadership.”

Wonders of the Living World: from Randomness to Life

“Rhoda is a Christian, and when she manages to describe one of the cell’s intricate mechanisms with a mathematical equation, she feels that she is seeing the mind of God.”

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